schedule

 

the schedule is subject to change

week 1: literacy, writing, and technology -- what are we to teach?
8/24

Introduction to class

8/26
  • sign up for twitter and blogger or wordpress
  • READ: Yancey, Kathleen Blake. "Made Not Only in Words: Composition in a New Key." College Composition and Communication. 56.2 (2004): 297-328. Print.
  • BLOG Post #1 (Groups A&B write): Respond informally to the following -- Describe your job as a writing instructor? Specifically, what skills do you feel your students should learn? Why? Does this mesh with Yancey's call? How or how not?
  • TWEET #1: Your favorite Yancey quote. USE #twt597
week 2: what is writing? what is composing?
8/31
  • READ: Wysocki, Anne Frances. "Opening New Media to Writing: Openings and Justifications." from Writing New Media. 1-41.
  • READ: Sidler, Michelle, et al. "Introduction: Reflecting on Technology and Literacy in the Composition Classroom." from Computers in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook. 1-7.
  • READ: CCCC Position Statement on Teaching, Learning, and Assessing Writing in Digital Environments. from Computers in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook. 15-19.
  • BLOG Post #2 (GroupsA&B write AND respond. choose anywhere from 2-all of your peers to respond to): 1) Describe your relationship to computer technology as a student, as a teacher, and as a human being in the world. What do you use it for? Do you find it necessary? A hindrance? 2) How does Wysocki define "new media" and how do you see this connecting with your notions of teaching with technology? (or do you?)
9/2
week 3: What are we doing and for whom? Agency & Power.
9/7
  • READ: Ohmann, Richard. "Literacy, Technology, and Monopoly Capital." from Computers in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook. 20-34.
  • READ: Foucault, Michel. "Panopticism." Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. Trans. Alan Sheridan, 1977. New York: Vintage Books, 1995. 195-228.
  • READ: Foucault, Michel. "The Eye of Power." Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings. Ed. Colin Gordon. New York: Pantheon Books, 1980. 146-165.
  • READ: Selfe, Cynthia L. "Technology and Literacy: A Story about the Perils of Not Paying Attention." from Computers in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook. 93-115.
  • BLOG Post #4 (GroupB Write BY 5PM MONDAY, GroupA Respond by classtime): Describe how Foucault can help us engage with the issues that Ohmann and Selfe raise and/or describe how Foucault can help us with the issues we've discussed so far in 597. In sum, use Foucault as a lens and see where it gets you.
  • TWEET #3: Find an interesting event, story, image, film, etc, on the web that you feel in some way connects to today's readings. Tweet the link and sum up its relevance.
9/9
  • READ: Banks, Adam. "Oakland, The Word, and The Divide: How We All Missed the Moment." from Race, Rhetoric, and Technology: Searching for Higher Ground. 11-46.
  • READ: Selfe, Cynthia and Richard Selfe. "The Politics of the Interface." from Computers in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook. 64-86.
  • BLOG Post #5 (GroupA Write BY 5PM Wednesday, GroupB Respond by classtime): What are the key concerns of Banks and Selfe&Selfe? How do the issues of agency and power that we discussed in class on Tuesday play out in today's readings? Consider, what would Foucault say to Banks and Selfe&Selfe.
  • PICK A BOOK for your book review (email me by day's end w/ choice)
week 4: information systems, our changing landscape
9/14
  • READ: Weinberger, David. Everything Is Miscellaneous: The Power of the New Digital Disorder. Prologue-Chapter 6 (pp 1-128)
  • TWEET #3-9: Tweet once per chapter, in some relation to Weinberger (a summary, a link to something, a 'this reminds me of....', etc)
9/16
  • READ: Weinberger, David. Everything Is Miscellaneous: The Power of the New Digital Disorder. Chapter 6-end. (pp 129-234)
  • TWEET. Each group must 1) respond to my prompt, and 2) respond to each group member's response. You're also welcome to tweet w/ other groups.
    • GROUP 1: Tim, Anna, Matt, Anwr: What is he trying to get at when he says, "in the third order, we are externalizing meaning" (171)? Do you agree? And who is this "we"? (realizing you can't answer all this in a tweet, pick and choose)
    • GROUP 2: Scott, Jill, Jessica, Rachel: "In this miscellanized world, every idea is discussed, so no idea remains simple for long" (213). Agree? Why or why not?
    • GROUP 3: Jacob, Deome, Malcom, Maggie: "Paper drives thoughts into our heads. The Web releases thoughts before they're ready so we can work on them together" (203). Agree? Why or why not?
week 5: research + the essay + "validity" in a digital world
9/21
  • READ: Johnson-Eilola, Johndan. "The Database and the Essay: Understanding Composition as Articulation. from Writing New Media. 199-235.
  • READ: Sorapure, Madeleine, et al. "Web Literacy: Challenges and Opportunities for Research in a New Medium." from Computers in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook. 333-349.
  • READ: SIdler, Michelle. "Web Research and Genres in Online Databases: When The Glossy Page Disappears." from Computers in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook. 350-366.
  • BLOG Post #6 (GroupB Write, GroupA Respond): First, do your best to sum up what you see as the key arguments from these three readings. Second, see if you can make any connections between these key arguments and A) Weinberger, B) any other course readings we've done.
9/23
  • READ: Logie, John. "Champing at the Bits: Computers, Copyright, and the Composition Classroom." from Computers in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook. 135-150.
  • READ: DeVoss, Danielle and Annette C. Rosati. "It wasn't me, was it?": Plagiarism and the Web." from Computers in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook.151-164.
  • BLOG Post #7 (GroupA Write, GroupB Respond): What intersections do you see between issues of copyright and plagiarism? What would Weinberger say about the arguments Logie and DeVoss/Rosati make?
week 6: Copyright - Read Only to Read Write
9/28
  • READ: Lessig, Lawrence. Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy. preface-224.
  • TWEET as you read, pertinant quotes or ideas or items of interest. (at least 3x)
  • BLOG Post #8 (GroupB Write, GroupA Respond): First, provide at least TWO questions about/around/surrounding Lessig you want to discuss in class (realizing your peers may respond as well). Second, and this is purposefully very open, what do you think so far of Lessig's points?
9/30
  • READ: Lessig, Lawrence. Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy. 224-end.
  • TWEET as you read, pertinant quotes or ideas or items of interest. (at least 3x)
  • BLOG Post #9 (GroupA Write, GroupB Respond): First, provide at least TWO questions about/around/surrounding Lessig you want to discuss in class (realizing your peers may respond as well). Second, (if you already posted, don't worry about it, i'm late). Revisit the Antoine Dodson remix and explain, first, what makes this a "remix." Second, describe what happens to the original meaning/intention in the remix. What kind of impilcations are there for the (arguable) loss of original meaning? Original Story and The Remix
week 7: Online Learning, Distance Education: Group 1 (Malcolm, Anna)
10/5
  • READ: Peterson, Patricia Webb. "The Debate about Online Learning: Key Issues for Writing Teachers." from Computers in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook. 373-384
  • READ: Brady, Laura."Fault Lines in the Terrain of Distance Education." Computers and Composition18.4 (2001): 347-358.
  • BLOG Post #9 (Groups A & B Respond): Represent your experiences/perceptions of online learning with 3(ish) picture/symbols/etc. and briefly explain how your choices relate to Peterson’s three key issues.
10/7
week 8: Asynchronous Discussions (Prof. Arola) MEET IN AML
10/12
  • MEET IN AML, Web Workshop. IF you don't need this, use the time accordingly.
  • By classtime, post to TEST discussion in Angel, just to make sure you can log in and that you understand the interface. Login here. Go to "communicate" and post something to "Test Discussion".
10/14
  • NO FACE TO FACE CLASS
  • Rovai, Alfred P. "Facilitating Online Discussions Effectively." The Internet and Higher Education. 10.1 (2007): 77-88.
  • POST to discussion forum in Angel. Login here. Go to "communicate" and see the discussion forum. You must post twice before Friday @ noon, in response to either my prompt OR another class member.
week 9: Preparing for Book Reviews. Synchronous Discussions (Prof. Arola)
10/19
10/21
  • Scott, Matt, Jessica, Jacob, and Jill will meet for a book review. Others are welcome to join them.
  • BLOG Post #10 (Groups A&B Write, Groups A&B Respond) In response to Tuesday's chat (find a partial transcript here, ANGEL erased the first bit unfortunately), describe how the chat went for you. What did you enjoy? What drove you mad? And what would you do as an instructor if you chose to use a space such as this? Make sure to respond to at least 2 of your peers.
week 10: Gaming + Composition: Group 2 (Scott, Tim, Jacob)
10/26
  • Gee, James Paul. "Introduction" and "Conclusion" and "36 Learning Principles" from What Video Games Have to Teach Us about Learning and Literacy."
  • Robison, Alice. "The Design is the Game: Writing Games, Teaching Writing" "Reading Games: Composition, Literacy, and Video Gaming." 25.3 (2008): 359-370.
  • BLOG Post #11 (Groups A and B): Consider how you might take a few of Gee’s learning principles and apply them to the composition classroom without the use of video games. Think about the learning principles that might be applied to assignments or the classroom in general.
10/28
  • TWEET progress or problems your group is facing in designing the game.Try to respond to at least two other tweets.
  • Come to class with the games that you designed between the end of class on Tuesday and today. Bring a small assignment sheet that could be given out to students that explains how to play the game.
week 11: Social Networking: Group 3 (Anwr, Maggie, Rachel, Jill)
11/2
  • Vie, Stephanie. "Digital Divide 2.0: “Generation M” and Online Social Networking Sites in the Composition Classroom." Computers & Composition. 25.1 (2008): 9-23.
  • danah boyd (Forthcoming). "White Flight in Networked Publics? How Race and Class Shaped American Teen Engagement with MySpace and Facebook." In Digital Race Anthology (Eds. Lisa Nakamura and Peter Chow-White). Routledge.
  • BLOG Post #12 (Groups A&B): Post an image of one of your social networking profiles (twitter, facebook, etc). Rhetorically analyze/break down the identity you've constructed on this site. In this analysis, you should discuss your audience. Often times, social networking sites are lauded for providing the opportunities to network beyond what we would be capable in real life. Is this the case with your social networking experience? Do you engage with people you do not know or have not met face-to-face at least once? You should engage with the reading, either boyd, Vie, or a combination of the two to discuss the ways in which your constructed identity (or, if you feel, representation of your actual identity) align with the statements boyd and Vie make. Clearly, we are outside our teens, which is where boyd's concerns lie. If you have relevant teen/early adolescent experience with social networking sites that can be brought into the discussion of social networking sites and identity in some way, feel free to share.
11/4
  • TWEET at least 2 interesting/conversation-worthy status updates that you see on facebook or retweet interesting tweets that are conversation-worthy. The tweets/facebook status updates can be about identity/the reading but do not have to be related.
  • BRING to class a handout that describes the assignment your group created. Be prepared to discuss.
week 12: Book Reviews
11/9 book review presentations.
11/11
week 13: Wikis & Blogs: Group 4 (Deome, Jessica, Matt)
11/16
  • Lundin, Rebecca Wilson. "Teaching with Wikis: Toward a Networked Pedagogy." Computers and Composition 25.1 (2008): 432-448.
  • Lowe, Charles and Terra Williams. "Moving to the Public: Weblogs in the Writing Classroom." Into the Blogosphere. Eds. Laura Gurak, et. al. Web.
  • BLOG (Groups A&B): What is the pedagogical value for asking students to write in public spaces?  What successes or failures have you     (or do you foresee having) by using wikis or blogs? How would you overcome technological barriers using blogs or wikis? If you were to use public writing in your own classroom, how would you go about doing so?  Use the readings in your justification.
11/18
  • Networked public writing --- In class activity.  Bring your laptop if you can.  
week 14: Final Presentations
11/30 office hours.
12/2 presentations from Deome, Matt and Malcolm
week 15: Final Presentations
12/7 presentations from Jacob, Tim, Jessica, and Anna
12/9 presentations from Scott, Maggie, Anwr, and Jill