jingles on a jingle dress

WRA 891

WRA 891

(american indian) rhetorics

Home Schedule Assignments
Home Schedule Assignments

Schedule


This schedule is subject to change. Readings are provided in D2L at http://d2l.msu.edu

Date Due for classtime
Week 1
August 30
  • Driving questions: Who are we and what do we hope to learn? What is American Indian philosophy? Is it defineable? How can we use American Indian lenses for engaging with rhetorical scholarship?

  • Arola, Adam. “Native American Philosophy.” The Oxford Handbook of World Philosophy, edited by William Edelglass and Jay L. Garfield. Oxford University Press, 2011, 554-565.
Week 2
September 4
  • LABOR DAY NO CLASS
Week 3
September 11
  • Driving questions: How do leading American Indian philosophers define American Indian philosophy? What kind of intersections do we see with rhetorical concerns? 

    Reading:
    Cordova, Viola F. How It Is: The Native American Philosophy of VF Cordova. Edited by Kathleen Dean Moore, et al. University of Arizona Press, 2007. 

    Deloria, Vine Jr. Excerpts from Part 1: Philosophy of Spirit & Reason: The Vine Deloria, Jr., Reader. Fulcrum Publishing, 1999. “Chapter 3: Relativity, Relatedness, and Reality” (32-39) and “Chapter 4: If You Think About It, You Will See That It Is True” (40-61). 

    **Waters, Anne. “Introduction.” From Waters, Anne W., Ed. American Indian Thought: Philosophical Essays. Blackwell Publishing, 2004. xv-xxxviii. (you are reading this primarily to complete the “to do” below)

    To do:
    **In group of 2, choose an article from Waters to read and teach on September 18. You can access these chapters via the Libraries’ “Request a chapter” .pdf option. Please include 2 backups and rank them. We will sort this out in class, but come to class with your group and your ranking.

    Reading Response:
    Part 1, Visual: Add Cordova and Deloria to the visual frameworks we created in class on the first day. How and where do their epistemological frameworks fit?
    Part 2, Written: Provide a brief (1-2 paragraph) summary of Cordova’s argument. Underneath this, include 4-5 quotes you love or hate from the book and briefly explain what you love or hate about them. Do the same for Deloria, however you only have to do 2-3 quotes.

    Turn into the D2L Dropbox by noon on 9/11.

Week 4
September 18
  • Driving questions: What type of concerns, questions, ways of being, ways of seeing, ways of knowing, emerge in American Indian Philosophy as a discipline?  

    Reading:
    Selections from Waters, Anne W., Ed. American Indian Thought: Philosophical Essays. Blackwell Publishing, 2004. SEE D2L

    • Team Makwa (Analisa & Tania): Lori Anne Whitt, "Biocolonialism and the Commodification of Knowledge"
    • Team Migizi (Cat & Shelbi): Brian Yazzie Burkhart, "What Coyote and Thales and Teach Us: An Outline of American Indian Epistemology"
    • Team Ajijaak (Eric and Derek): John DuFour, "Ethics and Understanding"
    • Team Maang (Emma & Eve): Gregory Cajete, "Philosophy of Native Science"
    • Team Namegos (Kenlea & Maddie): Thomas M. Norton-Smith, "Indigenous Numerical Thought in Two American Indian Tribes"
    • To Do:
      Read ALL of the articles. Prepare your presentation. Your group will be responsible for 30 minutes of class discussion based on the article you chose for your group. I expect your group to both share information (a brief lecture or otherwise ‘sharing relevant and/or related info’ component, AND a discussion and/or group work).

Week 5
September 25
  • Driving Questions: What about tribally specific ways of knowing? Do we agree with Cordova that American Indian ways of thought have more in common with one another than with “western” ways of knowing? What does tribal specificity help us do? What does pantribalism help us do? What do stories help us see/know?

    Reading: Johnston, Basil. Ojibway Heritage.  University of Nebraska Press, 1990

    LaPensée, Elizabeth and Joanna Hearne. “We All Stand Side By Side.” Studies in American Indian Literature 29.1 (2017): 27-37. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/659889

    Viewing: Watch all of the videos on The Ways: Stories on Language and Culture from Native Communities around the Central Great Lakes. http://theways.org/.

    Look at the artwork LaPensée's interview refers to, along with her other work. http://www.elizabethlapensee.com/#/art/ (scroll down to The Women, They Hold The Ground, 2015) EMAIL ANY QUESTIONS for Dr. LaPensee to me by Friday, 9/22

    Reading Response (to D2L by 1pm on Monday of classtime):

    Part 1: The thinking -- Look back at the chart/visual/drawing you made in the first few weeks of class on the frameworks of thought for Arola, Cordova, and Deloria. Jot down a few notes (to yourself) as to how the articles from last week connect up. The writing -- NOW write a short description of your visual along with the connections from last week. What are the trends you are seeing in American Indian philosophical thought? Describe how or if you see Johnston's book connecting to, intersecting with, or branching away from these trends.

    Part 2: Johnston sets up his book saying "I asked myself what it was that my tribe and my people would like other people to know about our culture" (6). After reading this book, what is it you think he wanted people to know? And how did he want them to know it?

    Part 3: The Ways. What stood out to you in watching these videos? Were there threads that ran through stories? Disconnections you found intriguing? (this is a loose question, a mix of "what did you think?" and "any connections to Johnston or what we've read so far?" In short: talk about it.

Week 6
October 2
  • NOTE: Dr. Arola had an emergency so we bumped this week ahead and got rid of our buffer week.

    Driving Questions: What does it mean to BE (in this case) Ojibwe? What happens when a rhetorician turns his eye to this question and to issues of sovereignty? What do we do with notions of essentialism? What does it mean to act for the good of a people?

    Readings:(note: If possible, I'd prefer you read these in the order listed below. Articles in D2L):
    - Lyons, Scott Richard. "Rhetorical Sovereignty: What Do American Indians Want from Writing?" College Composition and Communication. 51.3(2000): 447-468.
    - Lyons, Scott Richard. "The Fine Art of Fencing: Nationalism, Hybridity, and the Search for a Native American Writing Pedagogy." JAC. 29.1-2 (2009):77-105.
    - Lyons, Scott Richard. X-Marks: Native Signatures of Assent. University of Minnesota Press, 2010

    Reading Response (to D2L by 1pm on Monday of classtime):Provide a brief (1 paragraph) summary of each article. Underneath this, include 2-3 quotes you love or hate (or have some response to) and explain why. Do the same for the book, but make the summary a bit longer and include 4-6 quotes. End your response with 2 questions you would like us to talk about this week.

Week 7
October 9
  • Driving Questions: What does it mean to BE (in this case) Ojibwe? What happens when a rhetorician turns his eye to this question and to issues of sovereignty? What do we do with notions of essentialism? What does it mean to act for the good of a people?

    Readings:(note: If possible, I'd prefer you read these in the order listed below. Articles in D2L):
    - Lyons, Scott Richard. "Rhetorical Sovereignty: What Do American Indians Want from Writing?" College Composition and Communication. 51.3(2000): 447-468.
    - Lyons, Scott Richard. "The Fine Art of Fencing: Nationalism, Hybridity, and the Search for a Native American Writing Pedagogy." JAC. 29.1-2 (2009):77-105.
    - Lyons, Scott Richard. X-Marks: Native Signatures of Assent. University of Minnesota Press, 2010

    Reading Response (to D2L by 1pm on Monday of classtime):Provide a brief (1 paragraph) summary of each article. Underneath this, include 2-3 quotes you love or hate (or have some response to) and explain why. Do the same for the book, but make the summary a bit longer and include 4-6 quotes. End your response with 2 questions you would like us to talk about this week.

     

Week 8
October 16
  • Fixed and shifting identities, representations of being
    Readings:

    - Vizenor, Gerald. Manifest Manners. University of Nebraska Press, 1999.
    - (see D2L):Vizenor, Gerald and A. Robert Lee. "Chapter 5: Discursive Narratives."Postindian Conversations. University of Nebraska Press, 1999. (note, pp82-93 most important)
    - (see D2L): Arola, Kristin L. and Adam C. Arola “An Ethics of Assemblage: Creative Repetition and the Electric Pow Wow.” Assembling Composition. Eds. Kathleen Blake Yancey and Stephen J. McElroy. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English, 2017.
    - Tashina Emery, "My Voice" Blog Post. 27 July 2017. http://www.tashinaemery.com/blog/my-voice Also see email for context piece.

    Reading Response (to D2L by 1pm on Monday of classtime):Provide a brief (1 paragraph) summary of Manifest Manners. Underneath this, include 4-6 quotes you love or hate (or have some response to) and explain why. Next, describe what you think Vizenor and Arola & Arola would say about the Emery case? How might they make sense of it? Feel free to add personal opinion about the case (but not required).

     

Week 9
October 23
  • American Indian Rhetoric (all readings in D2L)

    - Arola, Kristin. "Composing as Culturing: An American Indian Approach to Digital Ethics." from Handbook of Writing, Literacies, and Education in Digital Cultures. Eds Kathy A. Mills, et al. Routledge, 2018.

    - Frost, Alanna. "Literacy Stewardship: Dakelh Women Composing Culture." College Composition and Communication, 63.1 (Septemnber 2011).

    - Powell, Malea. “Rhetorics of Survivance, How American Indians Use Writing,” College Composition and Communication, 53.3 (Feb 2002).

    - Powell, Malea. "Stories Take Place: A Performance in One Act," College Composition and Communication, 64.2 (Dec 2012).

    - Riley Mukavetz, Andrea. "Towards a Cultural Rhetorics Methodology: Making Research Matter with Multi-Generational Women from the Little Traverse Band." Rhetoric, Professional Communication and Globalization, Vol. 5, No. 1, February 2014, 108-125.

    - Stromberg, Ernest."Rhetoric and American Indians: An Introduction." American Indian Rhetorics of Survivance: Word Medicine, Word Magic. University of Pittsburgh Press, 2006.

  • Selections from King, Lisa, Rose Gubele and Joyce Rain Anderson, Eds. Survivance, Sovereignty, and Story: Teaching American Indian Rhetorics. Utah State UP, 2015.
    • King, Lisa, Rose Gubele and Joyce Rain Anderson. "Introduction Careful with the Stories We Tell: Naming Survivance, Sovereignty, and Story"
    • Driskill, Qwo-Li. "Decolonial Skillshares: Indigenous Rhetorics as Radical Practice
    • Haas, Angela. "Toward a decolonial digital and visual American Indian Rhetorics Pedagogy." 
    • Reading Response (to D2L by 1pm on Monday of classtime):
      Part 1: Choose TWO articles/essays/chapters from this week to pay super close attention to. For these two articles, do the following: 1) Briefly describe your understanding of the article, 2) Explain how you see the article both connecting with, and/or diverging from, the issues we've discussed in class so far (keeping in mind these are rhetoric and/or composition scholars).
      Part 2: Read the rest of the articles (not required to read as closely as the 2 you were assigned). Describe your overall thoughts on how rhetoric and composition scholars are taking up, using, engaging with, American Indian thought. Things to consider in this response: What are you noticing? Do you find these moves productive? If so, why? If not, how? Are the resonances you see between articles? Between articles and things we've read so far? What does it MEAN to say one does "American Indian Rhetoric"?
      Part 3: Include one question you'd like us to address in class.

Week 10
October 30
  • A rhetorical framework: Ambient rhetoric
    Rickert, Thomas. Ambient Rhetoric: The Attunements of Rhetorical Being. University of Pittsburgh Press, 2013. 

  • (see D2L) Grant, David M. Writing Wakan: The Lakota Pipe as Rhetorical Object. College Composition & Communication. 69:1, September 2017, 61-86.
  • In-class brainstorming for final project.

Reading Response (to D2L by 1pm on Monday of classtime):
Part 1: What is Ambient Rhetoric? What does Rickert mean by this? What does it help us do/see/understand?
Part 2: Why am I having you read this book given what we've read and discussed so far in class? What connections and intersections do you see with what we've discussed and read so far?
Part 3: What connections to see between Grant's article and Rickert? Grant explicitly makes some, but do you see others?
Part 4: [don't need to write this in response, but can if you want notes for yourself] Find a piece of Native art or performance (including some links below from our Week 8 class). Include a link to it, and be prepared to discuss how the idea of ambient rhetoric can be used to think through this piece. Think about both pros and cons of using ambient rhetoric as a lens for native texts.

Geronimo
1491s The Indian Store
http://www.nadiamyre.net
http://ericalord.com/home.html
ATCR Juno Awards: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3S4tCA_12Io
ATCR Neon Indians Remix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNi__fnadTM
Stand Up to Standing Rock: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Onyk7guvHK8
Supaman: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0jq7jIa34Y
DJ Shub: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTJvpfkRRdA
Tanya Tagaq: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCuayGvy3i8
Deanna M.A.D. Standup Routine: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJmjj_mo2i4&feature=youtu.be


Week 11
November 6
Things, objects, and rhetoric
Week 12
November 13
Ecologies and rhetoric
  • Cooper, Marilyn M. "The Ecology of Writing." College English, 48.4, 1986, 364-375.
  • Dobrin, Sidney I. and Christain R. Weisser. "Breaking Ground in Ecocomposition: Exploring Relationships between Discourse and Environment." College English, 64.5, 2002, 566-589.
  • Edbauer, Jenny. "Unframing Models of Public Distribution: From Rhetorical Situation to Rhetorical Ecologies." Rhetoric Society Quarterly, 35.4, 2005, 5-24.
  • Powell, Katrina M. "Review Essay: Locations and Writing: Place-Based Learning, Geographies of Writing, and How Place (Still) Matters in Writing Studies." College Composition and Communication, 66.1, 2014, 177-191.
  • Rios, Gabriela Raquel. "Cultivating Land-Based Literacies and Rhetorics." Literacy in Composition Studies, 3.1, 2015, 60-70.
  • Tuck, Eve, Marcia McKenzie and Kate McCoy. "Land Education: Indigenous, Post-Colonial, and Decolonizing Perspectives on Place and Environmental Education Research." Environmental Education Research, 20.1, 2014, 1-23.
  • Whyte, Kyle. "What Do Indigenous Knowledges Do for Indigenous Peoples?" in Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Learning from Indigenous Methods for Environmental Sustainability. Edited by Melissa K. Nelson and Dan Shilling. Cambridge UP. (In Press, 2017)

Reading Response (to D2L by 1pm on Monday of classtime):

First, briefly talk about the readings for this week. What did you like? Dislike? What are some takeaways for you? Connections? Contrasts? (you don't need to answer all these things, just talk about the readings).

Second, if we were to discuss one question or topic about the readings for this week, what topic would you like to discuss?

Third, wrap IT ALL up. Heh, ok, that's impossible. But,  look back at the schedule and remind yourself what we've read over the semester. Think about what it means to say one "does" American Indian Rhetoric? Think about in what ways our readings connect or diverge? Think about what things you might take from this class that intersect with your own work and questions? Again, you do NOT need to answer all of these questions, but instead consider this a "so what?" sort of question. What now? What do we make of this? 

Fourth, if there's one thing we can talk about regarding the entire semester,'s reading and content what would it be? 

Week 13
November 20
  • D2L Day. Submit Proposals to D2L by classtime (see discussion board). Use first hour of classtime for live feedback/conversation. You will be put in groups to do this work. Reminder, I will be at NCTE. Use that first hour of class to get online with each other.
Week 14
November 27
  • Presentations by Kenlea, Analisa, Tania, Shelbi, Maddie
Week 15
December 4
  • Presentations by Eric, Eve, Derek, Emma, Cat

 

Template borrowed and tweaked from w3.css